Temple Law Logo TU Portal

Topics

Latest News

By Jaya Ramji-Nogales

Welcoming Charlesworth, Chinkin & Wright

We at IntLawGrrls are delighted to welcome comments from Hilary Charlesworth, Christine Chinkin, and Shelley Wright.
Today the three offer comments to wrap up our month-long series reviewing the impact of their ground-breaking article, "Feminist Approaches to International Law," 85 American Journal of International Law 613-645 (October 1991).
Hilary Charlesworth
► We've already had the pleasure of introducing Australian National University Law Professor Hilary Charlesworth as an IntLawGrrls contributor, and have welcomed numerous posts relating to her and her work.
► Christine Chinkin is Professor of International Law at the London School of Economics and a barrister. In 2005, she and Hilary won the American Society of International Law's Goler T. Butcher Medal "for outstanding contributions to the development or effective realization of international human rights law."  An Overseas Affiliated Faculty Member at the University of Michigan, Christine also has been a Visiting Professor at Columbia University and Australian National University.
Her publications cover a broad range of fields and topics, from human rights and women's rights in particular to international criminal justice to international dispute resolution to the laws of occupation. She is inter alia a co-editor of The UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women: A Commentary (2012), which IntLawGrrl Lisa R. Pruitt reviewed in this IntLawGrrls post, and a co-author of The Making of International Law (2007).
Christine Chinkin
Christine's activities, which are too numerous to list here, include being an Editor of the American Journal of International Law and a member of the Advisory Board for the Leiden Journal of International Law, the European Journal of International Law, and the British Yearbook of International Law.  Christine has been a consultant on gender issues for many organizations, including Amnesty International, the Council of Europe, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, the Peruvian Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the UN Development Program, the UN Division for the Advancement of Women, and the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. She has also been a member of the Kosovo Human Rights Advisory Panel and the UN Human Rights Council Fact-Finding Mission to Gaza.
Shelley Wright left Australia and the University of Sydney in 2002 to take up the Northern Directorship of the Akitsiraq Law School – a law degree program offered to Inuit students in Iqaluit, Nunavut. All but one of the graduates of this program were women. She was in the Arctic, where she's pictured below, for almost 3 years.
Shelley then moved down to Vancouver, Canada, where she is Chair of the Department of Aboriginal Studies at Langara College. In Shelley's words:
'Although I still have a strong interest in women's issues, this has been overtaken to some extent by a major interest in Aboriginal rights both within Canada (including especially Inuit) and internationally. I am no longer focusing primarily on international law or feminist perspectives, but instead incorporate all these interests into teaching courses in Aboriginal Studies (including Global Indigenous Perspectives and Aboriginal Women in Canada as well as other courses) and my current research project on the Arctic and climate change.
Shelley Wright
'The continuing interest in the work that Hilary, Chris and I did changed our lives as well as helping to change the direction of thinking about what seemed to us at the time the last bastion of male privilege in law – international law. In many ways it still is of course, but in other ways international law has changed dramatically, not only in better recognizing women's issues but also the perspectives and rights of Indigenous peoples and other vulnerable groups. I credit my own feminist background in helping make it easier for me to see the differing perspectives of Indigenous peoples, although in many ways Aboriginal women's issues and feminism are not always a comfortable fit.'
In their joint post below, Hilary, Christine, and Shelley discuss the making of their article and reflect on the piece 21 years after its publication.
Heartfelt welcome!

Via IntLawGrrls

View Story

Posted Under :

Welcoming Noura Erakat

It's our great pleasure today to welcome Noura Erakat (right) as an IntLawGrrls contributor.
Noura, a human rights attorney and writer, is currently a Freedman Teaching Fellow at my home institution, Temple University, Beasley School of Law in Philadelphia.  She is also the US-based Legal Advocacy Coordinator for Badil Center for Palestinian Refugee and Residency Rights.
Noura has taught International Human Rights Law and the Middle East at Georgetown University since Spring 2009. Most recently, she served as Legal Counsel for a congressional subcommittee chaired by U.S. Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich (D-Ohio).
She has helped to initiate and organize several national formations, including Arab Women Arising for Justice and the U.S. Palestinian Community Network.
Noura has appeared on Fox’s “The O’ Reilly Factor,” NBC’s “Politically Incorrect,” MSNBC, Democracy Now, and Al-Jazeera Arabic and English. Her publications include: "Litigating the Arab-Israeli Conflict: The Politicization of U.S. Federal Courts" in the Berkeley Law Journal of Middle Eastern and Islamic Law, "BDS in the USA: 2001-2010," in the Middle East Report, and "U.S. vs. ICRC-Customary International Humanitarian Law and Universal Jurisdiction," forthcoming in the Denver Journal of International Law & Policy. She is a Co-Editor of Jadaliyya.com. You can follow her on Twitter at @4noura.
Noura's introductory post below responds to comments on the doctrine of responsibility to protect delivered by Patricia O'Brien, Under-Secretary for Legal Affairs and United Nations Legal Counsel, at the American Society of International Law Midyear Meeting earlier this month. In an IntLawGrrls post yesterday, Patricia (who'd posted on the same issue this past spring) contributed those remarks in full.
Noura dedicates her post to Hoda Shaarawi (1879-1947), an Egyptian feminist leader and the first Egyptian advocate of women’s rights. In Noura's words:
'She strove to raise awareness among Egyptian women, calling on them to claim their rights. Not only did she study in Europe and accompany her husband to many political meetings, but in 1923 she removed her face veil in public. She led the first women's first street demonstration, the first women's social service organization, and published the first feminist magazine.'
Today, Shaarawi (left) joins our list of transnational foremothers.
Heartfelt welcome!

Via IntLawGrrls

View Story

Posted Under :

Welcoming Julie Ayling

It's our great pleasure today to welcome Julie Ayling (right) as an IntLawGrrls contributor.
Julie is a Research Fellow in the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Policing and Security based in the Regulatory Institutions Network at the Australian National University in Canberra. Before joining the Regulatory Institutions Network in 2003, she worked for many years as a senior government lawyer, on issues of international law and communications law.
Her research interests include policing, transnational crime, criminal groups and state responses.
Among her publications is the book Lengthening the Arm of the Law: Enhancing Police Resources in the Twenty-First Century (2009), co-authored with with Professors Peter Grabosky, of Australian National University, and Clifford Shearing, of the University of Cape Town. In 2010, Julie won the Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology New Scholar Prize for her article "Criminal Organizations and Resilience," published in the International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice in 2009.

Julie recently spent time as a visiting fellow at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy. She holds a BALLB degree with first class honours from Macquarie University in Sydney, and a Master of International Law degree from Australian National University.
She dedicates her post to Judith Wright (1915-2000), an Australian poet, author, and environmental and indigenous rights activist. Wright was founder and later president of the Wildlife Preservation Society of Queensland, fighting for conservation of the Great Barrier Reef when oil drilling was proposed, and campaigning against sand-mining on Fraser Island, the largest sand island in the world. She also campaigned tirelessly for the rights of Aboriginal Australians. In Julie's words:
Judith Wright
'To me Judith Wright personifies persistence in the face of opposition and personal difficulties (amongst other things, she suffered deteriorating hearing loss and near blindness).  Judith’s writing was inspired by the country in which she lived. One of her constant themes was the relationship between humans and their environment. She believed that the written word has the power to alter perceptions and she put this conviction into practice.'
Julie's introductory post below aims to shape perceptions about the illicit trade in black rhinoceros horns.
Heartfelt welcome!

Via IntLawGrrls

View Story

Posted Under :

Welcoming Janine Lespérance

It's our great pleasure today to welcome Janine Lespérance (left) as an IntLawGrrls contributor.
Janine is in her final year of the M.A./J.D. program offered by the University of Ottawa Faculty of Law in conjunction with the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs of Carleton University. She is specializing in international law, and Conflict Analysis and Resolution, and has specific interests in post-conflict justice and corporate accountability. She earned her undergraduate degree from St. Francis Xavier University.
Janine has worked as a legal intern at the Bufete Jurídico Popular de Rabinal (Rabinal Community Legal Clinic) in Guatemala, as a research assistant at the Human Rights Research and Education Centre in Ottawa, and as a volunteer cooperant for Lawyers Without Borders Canada in the internal armed conflict section of the Guatemalan Ministerio Público. Recently, she received a University of Ottawa Public Interest Fellowship in Human Rights to support her work for Amnesty International Canada and the Canadian Centre for International Justice.
Her personal observations respecting the ongoing Mungwarere genocide trial in Canada, which she monitored for CCIJ, are recounted in Janine's introductory post below.
Heartfelt welcome!

Via IntLawGrrls

View Story

Posted Under :

Welcoming Aoife O'Donoghue

It's our great pleasure today to welcome Dr. Aoife O'Donoghue (left) as an IntLawGrrls contributor.
Aoife has been a lecturer at Durham Law School since 2007.  She specializes in public international law, with a specific interest in international governance. Aoife's current research focuses on international constitutionalization and the legal structures that have developed within international law to regulate governance.
Aoife received her Ph.D. from the University of Groningen in the Netherlands; her dissertation examined the constitutionalization of international law. Aoife earned her bachelor's degree from University College Cork, and completed an LL.M in International Law at City University, London.
With another IntLawGrrls contributor, Dr. Máiréad Enright, now of Kent Law School, Aoife is a Co-Director of the Irish Feminist Judgments Project. Aoife is also co-convenor of the Law and Conflict at Durham research cluster.
In her introductory post below, Aoife continues our series reflecting on the twenty-first anniversary of the publication of Feminist Approaches to International Law, which Hilary Charlesworth, Christine Chinkin, and Shelley Wright published in the American Journal of International Law.
Heartfelt welcome! 

Via IntLawGrrls

View Story

Posted Under :