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By Jaya Ramji-Nogales

'Nuff said

(Taking context-optional note of thought-provoking quotes)
'September 2012 marks one year since the Palestinian leadership introduced its bid for membership and recognition at the United Nations. Then, an international community – comprised of UN member states, NGOs, and Palestinians – watched the Palestinian leadership with apprehension and hope, eager that it would use the UN platform to embark on a new chapter of the Palestinian struggle for self-determination. One year onwards, it is clear that this leadership is more committed to preserving its rule in a truncated statelet than achieving national liberation.'
–  Noura Erakat, Abraham L. Freedman Teaching Fellow at Temple University, Beasley School of Law and the U.S.-based Legal Advocacy Consultant for the Badil Resource Center for Palestinian Refugee and Residency Rights, in an editorial entitled "Statehood Bid One Year Later: No State, No Bid, No Freedom," posted on Jadaliyya, the e-zine she co-edits.  As previously posted, Noura's scheduled to present her paper entitled "U.S. v. ICRC – Customary International Humanitarian Law and Universal Jurisdiction" at the ASIL Midyear Meeting to be held in Atlanta and at the University of Georgia School of Law, Athens, from October 19 to 21 (meeting registration here).

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Welcoming Mónica Roa

It's our great pleasure today to welcome Mónica Roa (right) as an IntLawGrrls contributor.
Mónica is Programs Director at Women’s Link Worldwide (prior posts here and here), a not-for-profit human rights organization based in Colombia and Spain that seeks gender justice throughout the world. She views the judiciary as a pivotal branch in democratic society and has worked at Women's Link to foster greater dialogue between civil society and the courts on how to interpret rights from a gender perspective.
In 2006, she successfully argued before the Constitutional Court of Colombia to overturn the country’s restrictive ban on abortion.  Mónica was named "Person of the Year" by leading media outlets in Colombia in 2005 and 2006, and was recognized in 2011 as one of the ten most important leaders in Colombia. She has also faced threats to her life, as recently as this year, for her work on reproductive rights. 
Mónica holds a law degree from the University of the Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.  She earned her Master of Laws (LL.M.) as a Global Public Service Law Scholar from New York University.   Mónica teaches at the Academy on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law at the American University, Washington, D.C. College of Law.  Her publications include: "Bodies on Trial: Sexual and Reproductive Rights in Latin American Courts" (2002) and "Litigating Reproductive Rights at the Inter-American System for Human Rights" (Harvard, 2003).
In honor of International Right to Information Day, in her introductory post below, Mónica discusses a recent, landmark case in the Constitutional Court of Colombia regarding the right to access complete and impartial information from the government.
As have other contributors (prior posts), Mónica has chosen to honor Olympe de Gouges (right) as her international law foremother. (image creditMónica writes of this French feminist who lived from 1748 till she perished beneath the guillotine in 1793:
'My job is to work so that justice is adjudicated with a gendered perspective. I think of her every time that I demand equality and justice for women and some would like to behead me. So far we have come, so far we still have to go.'
Heartfelt welcome!

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Write On! ASIL International organizations session

(Write On! is an occasional item about notable calls for papers)

The International Organizations Interest Group of the American Society of International Law will hold a works-in-progress workshop on Saturday, December 1, 2012, at the Arizona State University Building in Washington, DC.
If you are interested in presenting a paper at the workshop, please submit an abstract to Lorena Perez (lperez@oas.org), Justin Jacinto (jjacinto@curtis.com) and David Gartner (David.Gartner@asu.edu) by the end of the day this Friday, September 21. Abstracts should be a couple of paragraphs long but not more than one page. Papers should relate to the subject "international organizations."
Papers selected for presentation are due no later than November 17, as they will be pre-circulated. Papers should not yet be in print; ideally, authors will have time to make revisions based on the comments from the workshop.
The workshop's format will be as follows. Each paper will be introduced by a commentator, after which the author will have the opportunity to respond if he or she wishes. The floor will then be opened up for discussion. The workshop is conducted on the assumption that everyone has read all of the papers in advance. After the organizers have selected papers, they will ask for volunteers to serve as commentators. One need not present a paper or comment on a paper to participate. Registration for the workshop will open in October.
Please do not hesitate to contact the organizers should you have any questions about the workshop or paper submissions.

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Welcoming Savina Sirik

It's our great pleasure to welcome Savina Sirik (right) as an IntLawGrrls contributor.
Savina is a Team Leader for the Living Document Project and Public Information Room of the Documentation Center of Cambodia, where she has worked since 2004.
She has conducted extensive field research on the psychological impacts of the Khmer Rouge regime, worked on a documentary film about sexual abuse under the Khmer Rouge, and directed a comprehensive public information campaign about the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC).
Savina focuses on encouraging women’s participation both within the tribunal process and in the broader political system. She hopes to foster greater involvement of community members in political processes, particularly by encouraging women to take on community leadership roles.
Savina received her Bachelor of Arts degree in Archaeology from the Royal University of Fine Arts in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, and also holds a Master of Arts in Peace and Reconciliation Studies from Coventry University in the United Kingdom.
Recently, Savina interviewed Duch, who ran the Khmer Rouge's infamous Tuol Sleng prison, to which "enemies of the revolution" were sent. As IntLawGrrls have detailed in posts available here, Duch was the defendant in the first case before the ECCC, which found him guilty of crimes against humanity, torture, and murder, sentencing him to 35 years in prison. Savina discusses the interview in her introductory post below.
Heartfelt welcome!

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Write On! Global participation of children

(Write On! is an occasional item about notable calls for papers)
 
From Tali Gal of the School of Criminology at the University of Haifa and Benedetta Faedi Duramy of Golden Gate University School of Law comes a call for book chapters for their forthcoming edited volume Promoting the Participation of Children and Youth across the Globe: From Social Exclusion to Child-Inclusive Policies.  Proposals are due October 31; submission details are below. 
The authors describe the book as follows:
'The 1989 UN Convention on the Rights of the Child has inspired advocates and policy makers across the globe, injecting children’s rights terminology into various public and private arenas. Children’s right to participate in decision-making processes affecting their lives is the acme of the Convention and its central contribution to the children’s rights discourse. At the same time the participation right presents enormous challenges in its implementation. Laws, regulations and mechanisms addressing children’s right to participate in decision-making processes affecting their lives have been established in many jurisdictions across the globe. Yet these world-wide developments have only rarely been accompanied with empirical investigations. The effectiveness of various policies in achieving meaningful participation for children of various ages, cultures and circumstances have remained largely unproven empirically. With the growing awareness of the importance of evidence-based policies it becomes clear that without empirical investigations on the implementation of children’s right to participation it is difficult to promote their inclusion in decision making.
(credit)
How do children experience various fora of decision-making? To what extent do children feel that they are able to express their views freely and that their viewpoints are given due weight, in accordance with their age and maturity? What kind of representation do they regard as empowering and effective? How important do children consider their ability to influence the outcome of the process? Who do they want to be present in decision making mechanisms? These are some examples of child-centered investigations toward effective child participation that the various chapters of this book aim at describing. Other chapters may consider outcome variables focusing on the opinions of parents, professionals and family members regarding the way decision-making processes include children.
The overall goal of the book is to identify practices that promote child-inclusive decision making processes that allow children of various ages and other characteristics to engage in meaningful dialogue with others toward the achievement of optimal decisions. The book aims to provide a wide range of empirical data collected from various arenas and different localities. Child-participation in schools, child-protection processes, restorative justice mechanisms, family disputes and courts may be discussed in the various chapters through data collected from different countries, cultures and samples, creating a mosaic of child-participation mechanisms and their level of success.'
Interested?  Submit a proposal of 500 words, describing the main topics covered in the chapter, chapter structure, and an overview of the relevant sources.  Include a biographical sketch of 50-60 words identifying where you earned your highest degree, current affiliation and position, current research interests, and an email address.  You'll hear back by February 1, 2013.  If your proposal is accepted, the editors expect a full (7,000-10,000 word) chapter by November 30, 2013 for winter 2014 publication.  There's the possibility of a four-day writing retreat in May or June of 2013 to exchange drafts with other authors.
Send submissions to:
► Assistant Professor Dr. Tali Gal, School of Criminology, University of Haifa: tali.gal.04@gmail.com
► Associate Professor Dr. Benedetta Faedi Duramy, Golden Gate University School of Law: bfduramy@ggu.edu

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