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George R. R. Martin on Copyright, Inheritance, and Creative Control

This is Part 3 of the interview I did with George R. R. Martin in  2007.  For background and part 1, click here.  For Part 2, click here. For the audio file, click here.

HOFFMAN: Yeah, but you just generally right. The trope something that really speaks to folks. I guess maybe that raises a question about your fans generally. You’ve obviously got a huge fan base and I’ve been reading a little bit about them. One question that comes up a bunch of different times is fan fiction and what do you think about fan fiction?

MARTIN: I’m opposed to fan fiction.

HOFFMAN: Why?

MARTIN: Well number one, its copyright infringement and it can potentially endanger my copyrights and my trademarks if I were to allow it. Also, yes maybe it’s a gesture of love that they love your characters and they love your world and all that but it’s not the kind of gesture of love that I really want. And for aspiring writers and some of these people, sure it’s a wide range of fan fiction writers, some who are terrible. Some of them are actually talented writers. I think for the talented writers it’s particularly tragic because they should be doing their own material.

MARTIN: Now, I started writing for fanzines when I was back in high school and junior high. Back in Bayonne, NJ I was a comic fan and comic fandom was just starting back then in the 60s with little amateur [inaudible] magazines that sold for a quarter. And there were a lot of articles in there about the comic books we were reading so you could do non-fiction of that type or you could draw up characters if you were a talented artist. But there was also fiction and the fiction was of two types: one was the writers who wanted to write about characters in the actual comic books – they wanted to write a Superman story or they wanted to write a Spiderman story. That didn’t get very far and the company shut them down pretty quickly because they weren’t going to let their copyrights be infringed and start publishing amateur Spiderman stories. People very quickly switched to writing about their own characters. Now, some of the characters might have certain resemblances to Superman or Spiderman but you called them by a different name, you know they’re not Peter Parker, they’re Sam Smith, or something like that, you got a different character and you develop your character and you develop your world. That’s the kind of stuff I started with. I started with a character named Manta Ray since I couldn’t write about other people’s characters  and I really wouldn’t want to anyway. I wanted to do my own characters – make a character who ws great in his own right, who could stand up equal to those – and my own world. Those are the most important parts of writing. If you’re borrowing other people’s characters and borrowing other people’s...

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