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The Law of the Game of Thrones

In 2007, I did an interview with GRRM as a part of CoOp’s then vibrant “Law and Hard Fantasy” series.  (Yes, I know I’ve let it drop for half-a-decade, but new interviews are now coming out.)

Given the new-found fame of the Game of Thrones, I decided to have the interview transcribed for those of you who don’t want to listen.  Thanks to Temple’s Danielle Pinol who did the work.  I’m going to provide the transcript in three parts.  Here’s part I, about the roots of sovereign power in Westeros.  Part II talks about lawyers and magic. Part III will talk about fantasy literature more generally.

 

DAVID HOFFMAN: Today’s edition of Law Talk is unique in two respects: first I’m obviously not Nate Oman your usual host, I’m instead Dave Hoffman a law professor at the Temple University’s Beasley School of Law and with Nate, a blogger with Concurring Opinions. Today’s guest is distinct as well. George R.R. Martin is not a law professor, but instead a best-selling author of fantasy books including the renowned multi-volume work, “A Song of Ice and Fire.” The most recent book in that series, “A Feast for Crows,” was a New York Times #1 best seller. Martin is currently hard at work on the series’ next book, “A Dance for Dragons.” George joined me today to talk about the relationship of fantasy to law, a topic I recently blogged about several times. Along the way, we also talked about the laws of inheritance, copyright, and fan fiction; how to keep control over your work when it is filmed; remedies for breach of contract of sale in a magical world; and why most fantasy books seem to be set in England around the year 1400. I hope you enjoy it.  Ok well let’s get started, in some interviews you’ve suggested or other people have suggested that your books are fantasy for folks that don’t like fantasy. What does that mean?

GEORGE R.R. MARTIN: Well, that’s a marketing slogan but there’s a certain element of truth to that. I do get a numbers of fans who write me and say they enjoy my books but they’re not normally fantasy readers. One of the things I attempted to do when I started a Song of Ice and Fire these many years ago was to give as much of a flavor of historical fiction as of fantasy. And I think to the extent I’ve succeeded in that the books are attracting some people who prefer historical fiction to fantasy for whatever reason. I also wanted to make it a little grittier and more realistic than a lot of the fantasy that was out there at the time.

HOFFMAN: It seems like in order to make that happen, you do an immense amount of historical research and the way I think you’ve described it is you create a couple of bookshelves of information, you try to soak it all up and instead of working it in like a –

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Via Concurring Opinions

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